Home Towards a subjective collective cartography
QU'EST-CE QUE C'EST?
WHAT IS THIS?
WAT IS HET?
SEARCH
CONTACT
40 more maps that
Ton Bruxelles, (...)
Mapping for Niger
Villa Morel
les 9 yeux de google
Un très beau rayon
Dans et hors la (...)
L’incroyable téléphér
Dans les plis de la
Maps of Babel
Actions
Anouncements
Architecture
Art
Atlas
Ballades urbaines
carto
catalogue
collaborative
collective
commune
Conflicts
Data model
Diagram
Economy
Exploration
Free data
G.P.S
Game
gentrification
geodemographic profiling
Graphics
Humour
idées-théories
Imagination
inspiration
journal des outils
map
Mindmap
Multi-layered
politic
Print
projets
Psychogeography
Route
Satellite
sensible
software
sound
Statistics
subjective
Surveillance
Topology
transports
transversale
tresor
typographie
October 2010
September 2010
February 2010
October 2009
August 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
October 2008
September 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006

Des logiciels libres aux données libres
2009-07-15 11:20:44 - by Nicolas Malevé

Un article fort complet d’ Yves Jacolin sur les logiciels et données libres pour la géomatique. On y apprend entre autres qu’ Openstreetmap adopterait une nouvelle licence (en remplacement de la licence Creative Commons actuelle) pour préciser davantage ce que signifie la réutilisation de données et les travaux dérivés.

Lire en ligne

(Merci P !)

By way of contrast to utopias, heterotopias
2009-07-08 10:08:40 - by Nicolas Malevé

Some fragments, in French and English, of Foucault’s thoughts on Heterotopias.

« On ne vit pas dans un espace neutre, blanc. On ne vit pas, on ne meurt pas, on n’aime pas dans le rectangle d’une feuille de papier...
Il est bien probable que chaque groupe humain, quel qu’il soit, découpe dans l’espace qu’il occupe, où il vit réellement, où il travaille, des lieux utopiques. Il y a parmi tous ces lieux qui se distinguent les uns des autres, il y en a qui sont, en quelque sorte absolument différents. Des lieux qui s’opposent à tous les autres, qui sont destinés à les effacer, à les compenser, à les neutraliser ou à les purifier. Ce sont en quelque sorte des "contre - espaces". Ces "contre - espaces", ces utopies localisées, les enfants les connaissent bien. Bien sûr, c’est le fond du jardin, c’est le grenier, ou mieux encore : c’est la tente d’indien dressée au milieu du grenier...
La société adulte a organisé elle-même, et bien avant les enfants, ses propres "contre - espaces", ces utopies situées, ces lieux réels hors de tous les lieux. Par exemple : il y a les jardins, les cimetières, il y a les asiles, les maisons closes, les villages du Club Méditerranée et bien d’autres... En général, les hétérotopies ont pour règle de juxtaposer en un lieu réel plusieurs espaces (réels ou imaginaires) qui normalement seraient ou devraient être incompatibles... Les hétérotopies sont ces espaces différents, ces autres lieux, ces contestations mythiques et réelles de l’espace où nous vivons. »

Ecouter ici
Retranscrit ici.

« There are also, probably in every culture, in every civilization, real places - places that do exist and that are formed in the very founding of society - which are something like counter-sites, a kind of effectively enacted utopia in which the real sites, all the other real sites that can be found within the culture, are simultaneously represented, contested, and inverted. Places of this kind are outside of all places, even though it may be possible to indicate their location in reality. Because these places are absolutely different from all the sites that they reflect and speak about, I shall call them, by way of contrast to utopias, heterotopias. »

[...]

« The heterotopia is capable of juxtaposing in a single real place several spaces, several sites that are in themselves incompatible. Thus it is that the theater brings onto the rectangle of the stage, one after the other, a whole series of places that are foreign to one another ; thus it is that the cinema is a very odd rectangular room, at the end of which, on a two-dimensional screen, one sees the projection of a three-dimensional space, but perhaps the oldest example of these heterotopias that take the form of contradictory sites is the garden. We must not forget that in the Orient the garden, an astonishing creation that is now a thousand years old, had very deep and seemingly superimposed meanings. The traditional garden of the Persians was a sacred space that was supposed to bring together inside its rectangle four parts representing the four parts of the world, with a space still more sacred than the others that were like an umbilicus, the navel of the world at its center (the basin and water fountain were there) ; and all the vegetation of the garden was supposed to come together in this space, in this sort of microcosm. As for carpets, they were originally reproductions of gardens (the garden is a rug onto which the whole world comes to enact its symbolic perfection, and the rug is a sort of garden that can move across space). The garden is the smallest parcel of the world and then it is the totality of the world. The garden has been a sort of happy, universalizing heterotopia since the beginnings of antiquity (our modern zoological gardens spring from that source). »

From Michel Foucault Of Other Spaces (1967), Heterotopias.

Lire en français, Des espaces autres (1967)